Created (XML-WORKS_COUNTRY-Japan.xml) Open frame source for XML data.

( 51 Otomo Yoshihide 1959 2539 images/spacer.jpg New Jazz Quintet/Ensemble/Orchestra Accessed 12.12.06 from http://www.japanimprov.com/ - 2001 Japan audio/Yoshihide-New_Jazz_Ensemble-Eureka.wav 171 Yasunao Tone 1935 3384 images/spacer.jpg Group Ongaku a group devoted to creating event music and improvisational music - 1960 Japan audio/Tone-Group_Ongaku_Object-1960.wav 23 John Oswald 1953 142 images/works/Oswald-1993-plexure.jpg Plexture This is generally regarded as sampling maestro Oswalds best work. Split-second samples of several hundreds of widely known hits (from Madonna to Milli Vanilli via Springsteen) but you have no time enough to recognize them. On-and-off available expensive Japan 1993 issue (double-CD price for 22 minutes of music - one can say its worth it but it will still be too much). A masterpiece of sorts, for sure. Accessed 12.12.06 from http://mendedrecords.blogspot.com/2006/09/john-oswald-plexure.html Plunderphonics 1993 Japan audio/Oswald_2000-Mad_Mod.mp3 51 Otomo Yoshihide 1959 2538 images/spacer.jpg Filament Sachiko M and Otomo Yoshihide Accessed 12.12.06 from http://www.japanimprov.com/ - 1998 Japan audio/Yoshihidefilament14.wav 170 Akio Suzuki 1941 3961 images/works/Suzuki-2007-Noiseless.jpg Noiseless with Rolf Julius 2007 Japan audio/Suzuki-2007-Noiseless.wav 170 Akio Suzuki 1941 3961 images/works/Suzuki-2007-Noiseless.jpg Noiseless with Rolf Julius 2007 Japan audio/Suzuki-MOMAK_Installation_Performance.wav 169 Atau Tanaka 1964 3380 images/works/Tanaka-1998-vietnam.jpg 9m14s Over Vietnam A single photograph is the source for all the sound heard in the piece. It is the Pulitzer prize winning photo by Nick Ut of a girl running from a napalm attack in Vietnam, 1972. The image was scanned and treated using two techniques: time domain and frequency domain. The time domain treatment used the image data directly as sound. In the frequency domain treatment, the image was used as a sonogram, harmonic spectrum representation. This produced a series of elements that became the compositional blocks. The compositional manipulations in time and space are a reflection on the power of representation and misrepresentation in mass media. Accessed 25.04.2008 from http://sensorband.com/atau/soundimage/vnam/ - 1998 Japan audio/Tanaka-1998-vietnam.wav 169 Atau Tanaka 1964 3381 images/works/Tanaka-2000-bondage.jpg Bondage Bondage is music created using as its sonic basis, photographs of the Japanese photographer, Nobuyoshi Araki. The source photographs were scanned and analyzed using the software, Metasynth. The photograph becomes the sonogram representing the harmonic spectrum of the resulting sound. The image domain becomes the frequency domain - time traveling left to right in the photo, frequency on the vertical axis, and panning determined by color. Manipulation of the source image result in transformations of the sound. Different photos and manipulations of the photos were used to produce a series of source sounds which were then composed. Accessed 25.04.2008 from http://sensorband.com/atau/soundimage/bondage/ - 2000 Japan audio/Tanaka-2000-Bondage.wav 49 Toshiya Tsunoda 1957 4099 images/spacer.jpg Wind Whistling 1997 Japan audio/Tsunoda-1997-Wind.wav 49 Toshiya Tsunoda 1957 4100 images/spacer.jpg Cavity of Cylinder 1995 Japan audio/Tsunoda-1995-CavityOfCylinder.wav 49 Toshiya Tsunoda 1957 4101 images/spacer.jpg Curved Pipe 1995 Japan audio/Tsunoda-1995-CurvedPipe.wav 49 Toshiya Tsunoda 1957 4102 images/spacer.jpg Ferry Passing 1997 Japan audio/Tsunoda-1997-FerryPassing.wav 131 David Cunningham 1954 1852 images/works/Cunningham-2003-listening-tokyo.jpg The Listening Room and Stairwell (untitled) There are two installations in ICC, both in non-gallery spaces, the Lounge area and Stairwell. The basic technology consists of a system of microphone, noise gate, amplifier and speakers in the room, arranged in such a way that when the microphone and loudspeaker begin to feed back the amplitude of the sound causes the noise gate to cut off the signal. The feedback notes resonate through the space accentuated by the reverberation time of the space. As the sound falls below the threshold of the noise gate the system switches back on and the process continues. Through the introduction of a low volume feedback within the system, notes emerge, pitches delineated by the solid architectural characteristics of the space and modified by the transient nature of people passing through the space and disturbing the air. Available feedback pitches are a function of the resonant frequency of the space. In contrast to the controlled, more obviously analytical installation work in the Lounge area, the installation within the stairwell between the fifth and sixth floors in ICC will be developed onsite. A system of highly controlled amplification will audibly enhance and extrapolate what is already there - the peculiar resonant space created by the reflective ceramic shell of the stairwell. One intention is to isolate/highlight singularities created by the architecture of the available space. The technology consists of a double version of the system used in the lounge area. The two systems, electronically separate, inhabit the same acoustic space, and affect each other in ways that are not entirely predictable. The system will assimilate and adapt to any sound made in the space, including sound which leaks in from elsewhere in the building. The English critic Andrew Wilson has written: There is no metaphorical dimension, Cunninghams work is a presentation of fact. He relies on isolating sonic or other sensory elements from the conditions of their sources and through subtle framing makes us aware of that which would otherwise be disregarded. This hum that surrounds our lives, by being isolated, is also magnified and the dynamism and effect of everyday actions made clear. (1) For myself the most important quality is that it is a situation which is physically referential both to external contexts and to its own structure. With this work it is important to maintain the scale, volume and complexity at a level which creates a coherent individual experience. Less is more. The installations are centred on the following questions: How can active listening be encouraged? How does our awareness of acoustic surroundings influence our perceptions? What happens if you magnify the sound of a room? - 2003 Japan video/Cunningham-2003-listeningroom-tokyo.mpg 131 David Cunningham 1954 1852 images/works/Cunningham-2003-listening-tokyo.jpg The Listening Room and Stairwell (untitled) There are two installations in ICC, both in non-gallery spaces, the Lounge area and Stairwell. The basic technology consists of a system of microphone, noise gate, amplifier and speakers in the room, arranged in such a way that when the microphone and loudspeaker begin to feed back the amplitude of the sound causes the noise gate to cut off the signal. The feedback notes resonate through the space accentuated by the reverberation time of the space. As the sound falls below the threshold of the noise gate the system switches back on and the process continues. Through the introduction of a low volume feedback within the system, notes emerge, pitches delineated by the solid architectural characteristics of the space and modified by the transient nature of people passing through the space and disturbing the air. Available feedback pitches are a function of the resonant frequency of the space. In contrast to the controlled, more obviously analytical installation work in the Lounge area, the installation within the stairwell between the fifth and sixth floors in ICC will be developed onsite. A system of highly controlled amplification will audibly enhance and extrapolate what is already there - the peculiar resonant space created by the reflective ceramic shell of the stairwell. One intention is to isolate/highlight singularities created by the architecture of the available space. The technology consists of a double version of the system used in the lounge area. The two systems, electronically separate, inhabit the same acoustic space, and affect each other in ways that are not entirely predictable. The system will assimilate and adapt to any sound made in the space, including sound which leaks in from elsewhere in the building. The English critic Andrew Wilson has written: There is no metaphorical dimension, Cunninghams work is a presentation of fact. He relies on isolating sonic or other sensory elements from the conditions of their sources and through subtle framing makes us aware of that which would otherwise be disregarded. This hum that surrounds our lives, by being isolated, is also magnified and the dynamism and effect of everyday actions made clear. (1) For myself the most important quality is that it is a situation which is physically referential both to external contexts and to its own structure. With this work it is important to maintain the scale, volume and complexity at a level which creates a coherent individual experience. Less is more. The installations are centred on the following questions: How can active listening be encouraged? How does our awareness of acoustic surroundings influence our perceptions? What happens if you magnify the sound of a room? - 2003 Japan video/Cunningham-2003-stairwell-tokyo.mpg 131 David Cunningham 1954 1849 images/works/Cunningham-2004-interior.jpg Interior In this space are two microphones and four loudspeakers. Otherwise the space is empty. The sound of the space is magnified, amplified in real time. This work responds acoustically not only to the proportions and dimensions of the space but also to the physical presence of its audience, integrating the object of the work with its subject. This self referentiality is central to the installation - sound isnt used to illustrate an idea, it is the idea in itself. The work isolates and makes audible the movement of air within a given space, something invisible and so quiet we are normally oblivious to it. The English writer Andrew Wilson has written: There is no metaphorical dimension, Cunninghams work is a presentation of fact. He relies on isolating sonic or other sensory elements from the conditions of their sources and through subtle framing makes us aware of that which would otherwise be disregarded. This hum that surrounds our lives, by being isolated, is also magnified and the dynamism and effect of everyday actions made clear. (1) This space contains two systems of microphone, noise gate, amplifier and speakers. As with The Listening Room and other installations documented on this website, each system is arranged in such a way that when the microphone and loudspeaker begin to feed back the amplitude of the sound causes the noise gate to cut off the signal. The feedback notes resonate through the space accentuated by the reverberation time of the space. As the sound falls below the threshold of the noise gate the system switches back on and the process continues. The double system consists of two systems, electronically separate within the same acoustic space. The electronic part of the chain is independent but the acoustic part of the chain is interdependent - the two systems hear and react to each other in ways that are not entirely predictable. The system will assimilate and adapt to any sound made in the space, including sound which leaks in from elsewhere in the building. Non-Intentionality The music or sound of the various installations documented on this website has a structure based on physical principles, the inherent resonances of the space. It is what the composer Alvin Lucier has described as non-intentionality, rather than chance or indeterminacy. Lucier makes a comparison with a flock of birds in flight or a school of dolphins, the innate systems of balance of the ecological or physical world. This way of working allows a process to take its natural course, not to force something on to or out of the work - thereby allowing the content and the process to be the same thing. birds in flight A soundscape involving natural complexity is something our ears are instinctively very comfortable with - (we probably unconsciously or instinctively) recognise the structure. An comparison of how this could work is the act of looking at a tree - you dont look at every branch and leaf individually but they re all there if you want to look closer, you can enjoy a very different sense of ordering (in comparison to a man-made artefact) just by recognising the generality of tree and the variations of the generality and the specific. The idea of trying to work with natural complexity in a musical situation interested and frustrated me for a long time until I realised that I d been working with it for a long time. In sound, natural complexity is acoustic reflection, resonance, air moving in space and the generation of harmonics. - 2004 Japan video/Cunningham-2004-interior.mpg 110 Benoit Maubrey 1952 1601 images/works/Maubrey-1997-Geisha.jpg AUDIO GEISHAS In cooperation with the Japanese performance group Venus Show -- 4 Japanese performance artists were equipped with AUDIO KIMONOS complete with guitar amplifiers, digital memories, solar powered radio receivers, and microphones. - 1997 Japan video/Maubrey-1997-geisha.mpg 169 Atau Tanaka 1964 3382 images/works/Tanaka-2003-SSS.jpg Sensors_Sonics_Sights Cecile Babiole, Laurent Dailleau, and Atau Tanaka create together a dynamic sound/image environment. S.S.S is a trio performing visual music with sensors and gestures. They create a work of sound and sight, a laptop performance that goes beyond with the intensity of bodies in movement. Going beyond media: music that is more than a soundtrack, images going further than video wallpaper. A three-way conversation modulating sonic and luminous pulse and flow. Sensors capture gesture and corporeal movement, translating them into digital data: * Ultrasound sensors measure the distance between the performer’s hands and her machine, allowing her to articulate 3D imagery, navigating in color, scale, texture… * The Theremin, historical electronic instrument invented in 1919, an oscillator responds to perturbations of electrostatic fields based on the distance of the hands and body to the instrument… * The BioMuse places gel electrodes on the performer’s forearms, analyzing EMG biosignals. Muscle tension through concentrated movement allows the musician to sculpt sound synthesis. S.S.S’s singular approach brings them to present their work in a wide range of contexts in music and the digital arts. They are equally at home performing in galleries or underground spaces, in arts centers or research laboratories. Accessed 25.02.2008 from http://www.xmira.com/sss/ - 2002 Japan video/Tanaka-2002-SSS.mpg 6 Janek Schaefer 1970 25 images/works/janek_schaefer_concert_300.jpg untitled 2003 Japan 114 Merzbow 1956 4437 images/works/Merzbow-1981-Metal_Acoustic_Music.jpeg Metal Acoustic Music the first official studio album by the Japanese noise musician, Merzbow. It was later rereleased in 1989 as a remixed version by ZSF Produkt and again in 2000 as disc 2 of the Merzbox from Extreme Records. * Metal Acoustic Action is performed for damaged cassette deck with pre-recorded tapes. * Performed by Masami Akita. * Original material was recorded on 1980, released on 1981. * This tape is new mixed version which processed through the feedback system with digital effects. Remixed on 13/11/89. * The name was inspired by Lou Reed's Metal Machine Music, an influence on Masami Akita. Accessed11.08.2009 from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metal_Acoustic_Music 1981 Japan 51 Otomo Yoshihide 1959 3931 images/spacer.jpg MC HellShit and DJ Carhouse MC Hellshit and DJ Carhouse is a collaboration project between Japanese artists Yamantaka Eye (MC Hellshit), best known as a member of Boredoms, and experimental composer Yoshihide Otomo (DJ Carhouse). The duo released two live albums in 1996 and have no current plans for further releases together. Accessed 24.07.2008 from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MC_Hellshit_and_DJ_Carhouse 1996 Japan 29 Christina Kubisch 1948 241 images/works/kubisch-1991_Kyoto.jpg Music Between Parallel Wires 1991 Japan 29 Christina Kubisch 1948 242 images/spacer.jpg Magnetic Forest 1991 Japan 29 Christina Kubisch 1948 271 images/works/Kubisch-1994-False.jpg The True and The False 1992 Japan 30 Carsten Nicolai 1965 325 images/spacer.jpg Major Group Show 2002 Japan 30 Carsten Nicolai 1965 332 images/spacer.jpg Major Group Show 1999 Japan 36 Steve Roden 1964 485 images/spacer.jpg Fireworks 1991 Japan 36 Steve Roden 1964 489 images/spacer.jpg Asphalt Opera #9 w/Japanese theatre group Replicant 1995 Japan 36 Steve Roden 1964 494 images/spacer.jpg Communicating Vessels 1995 Japan 36 Steve Roden 1964 510 images/spacer.jpg SoundWork 1998 Japan 39 Carl Micheal von Hausswolff 1956 604 images/spacer.jpg Group exhibition 2000 Japan 40 Zbigniew Karkowski 1958 615 images/spacer.jpg END ID (with Helmut Schaefer) compilation 1997 Japan 58 Bernhard Gal 1971 861 images/spacer.jpg Defragmentation/white - 2000 Japan 58 Bernhard Gal 1971 862 images/works/gal-2002-GreenVoice.jpg Green Box Part of the Musashino Public Art Project Green Library, Musashino Chuo Library, Tokyo, November 2002 Green Voice Green Voice is based on the recorded voices of 28 people from Musashino and was presented in the framework of the public art project “Green Library” in the old public library of Musashino City, Tokyo. Through a light and sound installation, Bernhard Gal and Yumi Kori connect the personal statements of the participants with the library as a site of collecting and spreading knowledge. Sixteen loudspeakers project the voices into the library’s four-storey archive area; one hears young and old, male and female Japanese voices, from above and below, from close up and further away. The speech recordings consist of answers to certain questions (“What is your name?”, “How old are you?”, “Describe your favorite green!”, “What is your favorite book?”); the voices also hum a melody. Yumi Kori installs green light boxes as an abstracted memory of the books formerly stored here. The visitors carefully explore the dark space, a labyrinth of bookshelves, which is now acoustically filled with the stories of the recorded people. - 2002 Japan 43 Achim Wollscheid 1962 895 images/spacer.jpg say - 1995 Japan 43 Achim Wollscheid 1962 901 images/spacer.jpg Kunitachi sound transformation (live transformation of street noise into sonic structures) - 1996 Japan 54 David Toop 1949 925 images/spacer.jpg Dreaming of Inscription On Skin with Max Eastley - 2002 Japan 21 Ryoji Ikeda 1966 1145 images/works/Ikeda-2002-db.jpg db Ikedas sound installation in an anechoic chamber is intended to quite physically explode the senses. Using the highest and lowest frequencies that human ears can bear, db is a hyper-dense composition of sine waves, white noise and other elements, which blurs the lines between noise and music, thought and matter. The visual equivalent experienced in the dazzling bright white light chamber one enters after passing through a dark hallway between the two spaces completes the sense-shattering totality. - 2002 Japan 21 Ryoji Ikeda 1966 1148 images/works/Ikeda-2004-dataspectra.jpg data.spectra [prototype] data.spectra is the first work of the data.series. Across the entire width of a darkened room is an intensely bright, narrow screen. On moving closer, the screen reveals that the source of the flood of light into the room is a vast array of tiny digits streaming across the surface, seemingly without end. - 2004 Japan 21 Ryoji Ikeda 1966 1150 images/spacer.jpg untitled [for 10 turntables] - 2001 Japan 77 Hans Peter Kuhn 1952 1188 images/works/Kuhn-1996-Sounds.jpg Sounds for a Space in the Sun Akio Suzuki and his wife Junko Wada built this meditation site Space in the Sun on top of a hill near their home in Aminotown, province Tango (Pref. Kyoto) in Japan. The axis of the space is along the 135th latitude and is made of 2 walls and the floor between them. The materials are sundried bricks. The installation was created after an invitation by Akio Suzuki to use this space: 8 coloured Polaroids where placed equidistantly along one of the walls. 8 loudspeakers hung opposite the photos. The polaroids seemed like little windows into space, the loudspeakers played short bits of daily life sounds interrupted by pauses of silence. - 1996 Japan 116 Brian Eno 1948 1384 images/spacer.jpg Sound and Light - 1989 Japan 116 Brian Eno 1948 1387 images/spacer.jpg Natural Selections Audio, Video, Slide and Light 1990 Japan 9 Max Eastley 1946 1807 images/spacer.jpg Exhibition (details unknown) - 1993 Japan 9 Max Eastley 1946 1831 images/spacer.jpg Untitled live show - 1993 Japan 123 Karlheinz Stockhausen 1928 2385 images/works/Stockhausen-1966-Telemusik.jpg TELEMUSIK 17 min. 30 sec www.stockhausen.org - all material copyrighted by the Stockhausen Foundation for Music, Kuerten, Germany 1966 Japan 123 Karlheinz Stockhausen 1928 2386 images/works/Stockhausen-1966-Telemusik.jpg SOLO 17 min www.stockhausen.org - all material copyrighted by the Stockhausen Foundation for Music, Kuerten, Germany 1966 Japan 123 Karlheinz Stockhausen 1928 2392 images/works/Stockhausen-1970-concert.jpg Spherical Concert Hall For the 1970 World Expo in Osaka in 1970, Germany built the worlds first, and so far only, spherical concert hall. It was based on artistic concepts by Karlheinz Stockhausen and an audio-technical concept from the Electronic Studio at the Technical University in Berlin. The audience sat on a sound-permeable grid just below the centre of the sphere, 50 groups of loudspeakers arranged all around reproduced, fully in three dimensions, electro-acoustic sound compositions that had been specially commissioned or adapted for this unique space. Works by composers including Bernd Alois Zimmermann and Boris Blacher were played from the multi-track tape, along with Bach and Beethoven. In the course of the 180-day exhibition, Stockhausen and a high-calibre, 19-strong ensemble gave live concerts for over a million visitors; Spiral, for a soloist and short-wave receiver was played over 1300 times, for example. It was possible to achieve the three-dimensional sound distribution live, using a spherical sensor built in Berlin to feed the 50 sound sources, but a ten-channel rotary mill constructed to Stockhausens design was deployed more frequently. Golo Föllmer. Accessed 11.12.06 from http://www.medienkunstnetz.de/works/stockhausen-im-kugelauditorium/ www.stockhausen.org - all material copyrighted by the Stockhausen Foundation for Music, Kuerten, Germany 1970 Japan 114 Merzbow 1956 2500 images/works/Merzbow-1990-cloud.jpg Cloud Cock 00 Grand 1. Brain Forest For Metal-Acoustic Concrete 23:40 2. Spinnozaamen 24:04 3. Autopussy Go No Go 7:43 4. Modular/Postfix 18:56 - 1990 Japan 114 Merzbow 1956 2505 images/spacer.jpg Zeitkratzer - Noise\...[lärm] - 2001 Japan 114 Merzbow 1956 2508 images/works/Merzbow-1997-mazk.jpg Masami Akita and Zbigniew Karkowski (aka MAZK) 1. Visible 10:56 2. Transparent 24:30 3. Exposed 20:01 - 1997 Japan 51 Otomo Yoshihide 1959 2526 images/works/Yoshihide-1999-turntablesolos.jpg Turntable Solos # Christian Marclay - Dont Stop Now (2:15) Recorded at Harmonic Ranch in New York, 1998 Engineered by Quentin Chiappetta # Crawling with Tarts - Trecher Track (4:12) Performed by Suzanne Dycus-Gendreau and Michael Gendreau # Erik M - No Accident (3:53) Recorded and mixed by Erik M in August 1995 # Extasis - Neurosis (5:29) Recorded by Timmy Lok in Hong Kong, 1992 Mixed and edited by Tsuguto Tsunoda in 1997 # Frank Schulte - Das geht doch nicht (3:59) Recorded in August 1995 # George Budd - Political Science (4:05) Recorded on a Panasonic 3500 # L?K?O - Slow Breathin (3:59) Recorded in Tokyo, 1999 # Martin Tétreault - Kind of F.J.F. (4:08) Recorded by Marc Tremblax Edited and mixed by Tremblax and Tétreault in Montréal, August 1995 # Massimo Simonini - SCI....... Several movements (1:38) Recorded in Bologna, 1995 # Massimo Simonini - Mama, Brucia (0:58) Recorded in Bologna, 1995 # Merzbow - Batztoutai: The Nightingales Song (Short version) (8:59) Composed and performed by Masami Akita Recorded at ZSF Product studio in Tokyo, 1985 Originally released as Batztoutai with Memorial Gadgets (2-LP set, 1986, RRR, USA); re-released as Batztoutai with Material Gadgets (2-CD set, 1993, RRR, USA) Re-mastered from the original tapes in 1993 Re-edited from the CD version by Otomo Yoshihide at A-102 Studio in Tokyo, 1999 # Mood Man - ZZZ... (2:47) Recorded in Tokyo, 1998 # Otomo Yoshihide - Turntable with Guitar AmP (5:39) Recorded live by Naoaki Kose at Earth Studio in Tokyo, 1998 Mixed by Otomo Yoshihide at A-102 Studio in Tokyo, 1998 # PNF - Nothing ???? (2:12) Composed and performed by Dickson Dee (Li Chin Sung) Recorded at Sound Factory Studio in 1995 # PNF - Teresa Teng (1:15) Composed and performed by Dickson Dee (Li Chin Sung) Recorded at Sound Factory Studio in 1995 # Rik Rue - Music for Non Thinkers (3:46) Recorded in Australia, 1992 # Takeshi Fumimoto - (4:53) Recorded with 3 turntables and media directly on hard disc at Sperrmuecc Studio in Vienna, 1998 # Tsuguto Tsunoda - Air Pocket (2:46) Recorded and mixed at Tsunoda s room in Tokyo, 1997 Accessed 12.12.06 from http://www.japanimprov.com/ - 1999 Japan 51 Otomo Yoshihide 1959 2527 images/works/Yoshihide-2000-masters.jpg Masters of Japanese Electronic Music 1. Cartrige (2:42) Yoshihide Otomo: selfmade electronics 2. The Hangman (7:57) Kazunao Nagata: ARP2600 synthesizer 3. NNN2000 (8:01) Nerve Net Noise: Tsuyoshi Nakamaru: System Rouge, effects, mix Hiroshi Kumakiri: System Blue-Wink, effects 4. Unbelievably Irritating STT (9:55) Incapacitants: T. Mikawa: electronics (crystal microphone, metal sheet with contact pick-up, electro-harmonix, broken mini-synthesizer, Ishibashi thermin, beebaa, octavia, sick pitch king, doctor 9, buzz box, digital pitch shifter/delay, TASCAM 4 track cassette MTR), voice F. Kosakai: electronics (handmade electronic sound generators, Amdeck percussion synthesizer, Audio Technica dynamic microphone, TASCAM 4 track cassette MTR, DOD buzz box, electro harmonix frequency analyzer, BossHyper fazz, KORG multi-effector Tone Works), voice 5. Nekomata (7:04) Manabu Yuasa: minorun, seamoon funk machine, ELK tape echo, Fender digital delay 6. 83mb (8:20) Merzbow: Macintosh Powerbook G3 7. 77UP (3:10) Hanatarashi: TASCAM 8 track open reel deck Produced by Eye 8. Star Liner (Dub Sonic Sound System Mix) (8:59) Hado-ho: Maxon PSM8, KORG Kaoss Pad, Boss SE70, Roland VS1680, Casio MA120, Jomox XBASE09, Boss DR660 Produced by Takehito Nakazato Mastered by Kazunao Nagata at Transonic Studio in Tokyo Artwork: Naohiro Ukawa Includes liner notes by Takehito Nakazato in Japanese The original-issue CD is packaged in a metal container, together with a card for each musician (eight cards in all), including the musicians photo and signature and a list of instruments/equipment he uses in the recording. The second-issue CD is packaged in a brown envelope, without cards. Accessed 12.12.06 from http://www.japanimprov.com/ - 2000 Japan 51 Otomo Yoshihide 1959 2534 images/works/Yoshihide-2002-festival.jpg Festival Beyond Innocence: A Brief History in 67 Chapters Disc 1: October 9 and 10, 1996 and October 10 and 11, 1997 1. Yoshihide Otomo, Tetsuji Iwasaki and Takashi Kojima (3:56) 1997 Yoshihide Otomo (turntables, guitar), Tetsuji Iwasaki (bass) and Takashi Kojima (laptop, sampler) 2. Bidziliba - Broadcasted Graffiti (3:57) 1997 Written by Furutaro and Junko Fuchigami Bidziliba with Junko Fuchigami (vocal), Furutaro (guitar), Mari Era (percussion) and Hiroshi Funato (bass) 3. Kazutoki Umezu and Yasuhiro Otani (2:32) 1996 Kazutoki Umezu (alto sax) and Yasuhiro Otani (laptop) 4. Psychoacoustic (4:58) 1996 Psychoacoustic with Elliott Sharp (guitar, bass clarinet, programming) and Zeena Parkins (electric harp) 5. Yumiko Tanaka, Samm Bennett and Kazuhisa Uchihashi (7:36) 1996 Yumiko Tanaka (gidayu shamisen), Samm Bennett (drums, samples) and Kazuhisa Uchihashi (guitar) 6. Suonomono (3:47) 1997 Suonomono with Masayuki Akamatsu (laptop), Atsushi Yamaji (piano), Keiichi Kitahara (electronics) and Takayuki Kitahara (electronics) 7. Ruins and Yoshihide Otomo (4:19) 1997 Ruins with Tatsuya Yoshida (drums, vocal), Hisashi Sasaki (bass); and Yoshihide Otomo (turntables, guitar) 8. Royal Squeezit and Michiyo Yagi (1:54) 1997 Royal Squeezit with Emi Eleonola (vocal, piano) and Yuji Katsui (violin); and Michiyo Yagi (20-string koto) 9. Omoide Hatoba (5:13) 1996 Omoide Hatoba with Seiichi Yamamoto (guitar), Atsushi Tsuyama (bass), Atari (drums) and Takashi Ogushi (drums) 10. Atsushi Tsuyama, Kumiko Takara and Mari Era (4:14) 1997 Atsushi Tsuyama (bass, vocal), Kumiko Takara (percussion) and Mari Era (percussion) 11. Emi Eleonola and Samm Bennett (2:02) 1997 Emi Eleonola (vocal, piano) and Samm Bennett (percussion, electronics) 12. Bob Ostertag and Yoshihide Otomo (3:46) 1996 Bob Ostertag (sampler) and Yoshihide Otomo (turntables, guitar) 13. Shuichi Chino and Seiichi Yamamoto (6:09) 1997 Shuiichi Chino (piano, voice) and Seiichi Yamamoto (guitar) 14. Martin Tétreault and Kazuhisa Uchihashi (2:41) 1997 Martin Tétreault (turntables) and Kazuhisa Uchihashi (guitar) 15. Kam-pas-nel-la - Impressions of Africa (5:36) 1996 Written by Kazuhisa Uchihashi and Haco Kam-pas-nel-la with Haco (vocal), Zeena Parkins (harp), Samm Bennett (drums, samples) and Kazuhisa Uchihashi (guitar) 16. Leonid Soybelman, Mitsuru Nasuno and Yoshimitsu Ichiraku (4:35) 1997 Leonid Soybelman (vocal, guitar), Mitsuru Nasuno (bass) and Yoshimitsu Ichiraku (drums, electronics) Accessed 12.12.06 from http://www.japanimprov.com/ 4-CD set 2002 Japan 51 Otomo Yoshihide 1959 2535 images/spacer.jpg Haunted Weather CD 1 - Haunted 1. Christian Marclay - Jukebox Capriccio (3:06) Taken from the album Records (Atavistic, alp62cd) 2. Oval - 8. - (2:59) Taken from the album Ovalcommers (Thrill Jockey, thrill 103) 3. Matmos - l.a.s.i.k. (3:52) Taken from the album A Chance to Cut Is a Chance to Cure (Matador, OLE-489 2) 4. Terre Thaemlitz - Resistance to Change Parts 2 and 3 (4:04) Taken from the album Means from an End (Mille Plateaux, MP CD 44) 5. Janet Cardiff - The Missing Voice (excerpt) (5:01) Taken from the publication The Missing Voice (Case Study B) (Artangel) 6. Peter Cusack - Flight Path Trace (2:48) Taken from the album The Horse Was Alive the Cow Was Dead (LMC, RES WOSM1) 7. Yuko Nexus6 - Jadore la Boucle #1/Berlin 1936 (4:37) Taken from the album Journal de Tokyo (Sonore, SON-18) 8. Sarah Peebles - Three Active Serves (2:29) Taken from the enhanced CD 108: Walking through Tokyo at the Turn of the Century (Post-Concrete, P0ST004) 9. Haco - Start Up + No Wave (4:42) Taken from Improvised Music from Japan 2002-2003 (Improvised Music from Japan, IMJ-301) 10. Otomo Yoshihide, Sachiko M, and Günter Müller - Filament 2-5 (4:55) Taken from the album Filament 2 (For 4 Ears, CD 1031) 11. Alvin Lucier - Sferics (excerpt) (3:02) Taken from the album Sferics (Lovely Music, LP 1017) 12. Evan Parker - Line 3 (excerpt) (4:44) Taken from the album Lines Burnt in Light (Psi, psi 01.01) 13. Max Eastley and David Toop - Eyelash Turned Inwards (3:16) Taken from the album Doll Creature (BiP_HOp, bleep 25) 14. Tetuzi Akiyama, Toshimaru Nakamura, Taku Sugimoto, and Mark Wastell - First Fold (excerpt) (5:19) Taken from the alubm Foldings (Confront, 12) 15. Spontaneous Music Ensemble (John Stevens, Nigel Coombes, Roger Smith, and Colin Wood) - The Only Geezer an American Shot Was Anton Webern (excerpt) (6:03) Taken from the album Low Profile (Emanem, 4031) 16. Tacita Dean - Aden, Yemen 4am (4:15) Taken from the work Juke Box 17. John Oswald - Lune (2:28) Taken from the album Plunderphonics 69/96 (Seeland, SEE 515CD) 18. Yurihito Watanabe - The Door Practice: Summer Solstice (5:00) Taken from the album Mille Comédies: le Double Inaudible (Airplane, AP1015) CD 2 - Weather 1. Autechre - Parhelic Triangle (6:04) Taken from the album Confeild (Warp, WARPCD128) 2. Christian Fennesz - Caecilia (3:48) Taken from the album Endless Summer (Mego, 035) 3. Ryoji Ikeda - C7 :: Continuum (5:25) Taken from the album 0°C (Touch, TO:38) 4. Derek Bailey and John Stevens - Reflecters (5:25) Taken from the album Playing (Incus, CD14) 5. Akio Suzuki - Analapos (6:04) Previously unreleased Recorded by Akinori Yamasaki at Fossil Studio, Tango, Japan, 2003 6. Chris Watson - Vatnajökull (excerpt) (4:56) Taken from the album Weather Report (Touch, TO:47) 7. Pan Sonic - Maa (6:16) Taken from the album A (Blast First, BFFP149CD) 8. John Butcher - Swan Style (3:31) Taken from the album Invisible Ear (Fringes, 12) 9. Kaffe Matthews - Clean Tone Falling (excerpt) (5:31) Taken from the album CD Eb + Flo (Annette Works, Awcd0005-6) 10. Toshiya Tsunoda - Bottle at Park (4:30) Taken from the album The Air Vibration inside a Hollow (Häpna) 11. Taku Sugimoto - Dotted Music No. 1 (3:16) Taken from the album Chamber Music (Bottrop-Boy, B-BOY 019) 12. David Cunningham - Two Listening Rooms/Birmingham (excerpt) (3:05) Previously unreleased Recorded at the Ikon Gallery, Birmingham, UK, November 7, 2003 13. Carsten Nicolai and Ryuichi Sakamoto - Duoon (5:40) Taken from the album Vrioon (raster-noton, r-n 50) 14. Keith Rowe and John Tilbury - Cathnor (excerpt) (5:54) Taken from the album Duos for Doris (Erstwhile, 030-2) 15. Jem Finer - Longplayer 13.2.2003 (excerpt) (4:27) Previously unreleased Curated by David Toop as an audio version of his book, Haunted Weather: Music, Silence and Memory. Accessed 12.12.06 from http://www.japanimprov.com/ 2-CD set 2004 Japan 51 Otomo Yoshihide 1959 2537 images/spacer.jpg I.S.O. Yoshimitsu Ichiraku, Sachiko M, Otomo Yoshihide Accessed 12.12.06 from http://www.japanimprov.com/ - 1998 Japan 51 Otomo Yoshihide 1959 2540 images/works/Yoshihide-1995-tatakiuri.jpg Tatakiuri: Japan/China Point of Sales Tour 1. Dr. Rosenberg in TianÕan Men Square (0:32) 2. Ethno Shop (1:04) 3. Opening Time (2:03) 4. Seicho Tsugaru Tatakiuri-bushi (2:39) 5. Door to Door Salesman 1 (0:54) 6. Bargain Hunt Cult (3:31) 7. Beautiful Elevator Girl (2:21) 8. Japanese Manga Shopping (4:02) 9. Shopping Requiem (4:06) 10. MaoÕs Techno Rave (8:31) 11. Door to Door Salesman 2 (1:43) 12. In Budget Paradise (1:04) 13. Japanese Porn Ads 2 (7:21) 14. Stereo Balance Test (2:15) 15. Daikoku-za TV Shopping (3:59) 16. Sohran Shopping (4:12) 17. Door to Door Salesman 3 (4:49) 18. Japanese Speedcore Shoppers (0:18) 19. Water Businessman (2:42) 20. Shopping Tour in Peking: Live in Peking (4:46) 21. Kaimono Urami-bushi (3:11) 22. Memoirs Shopping (0:57) 23. Japanese Doom Shoppers (0:18) 1. Dr. Johannes Rosenberg and Mr. Aha May (voice) 2. Tokyo Nammy (sampled voice), Jon Rose (violin), Yoshihide Otomo (sampler and remix), Tsuguto Tsunoda (sales samples) 3. Jon Rose (violin), Yoshihide Otomo (turntables and remix), Sachiko Matsubara (department store girl) 4. Michihiro Satoh (tsugaru-shamisen), Jon Rose (violin), Tsuguto Tsunoda (sales samples), Yoshihide Otomo (remix) 5. Marie-Mart (voice), Jon Rose (violin and washing), Ryoji Hojito (Japanese salesman), Yoshihide Otomo (remix) 6. Mitsuru Nasuno (voice), Jon Rose (violin and voice), Nelson Hiu (Asian flutes), Yoshihide Otomo (guitar, turntables and remix), Kazuyoshi Kimoto (violin), Masaki Shimizu (bass), Yasuhiro Yoshigaki (voice and drums), Tsuguto Tsunoda (sales samples) 7. Jon Rose (violin), Yoshihide Otomo (turntables and remix), Shigenori Noda and Sachiko Matsubara (elevator girl samples) 8. Koichi Makigami (voice), Jon Rose (violin), Yoshihide Otomo (turntables), Jo ÒDocÓ Rosenberg (violin) 9. Jon Rose (violin), Nelson Hiu (voice and Asian flutes), Yoshihide Otomo (turntables), Kazuhisa Uchihashi (guitar) 10. Jimmi Rosenberg (violin), DJ Car-House (turntables), Mao Tse-Tung (voice), DJ Mao (remix), Dr. Johannes Rosenberg (voice from TianÕan Men) 11. Marie-Mart (voice), Jon Rose (washing), Ryoji Hojito (Japanese salesman), Yoshihide Otomo (remix) 12. Tokyo Nammy (sampled voice), Jon Rose (violin), Yoshihide Otomo (toy sampler and DAT) 13. Jon Rose (violin), Hoppy Kamiyama (synthesizers), Tetsu Shiba (pianica), Ryoji Hojito (piano and toys), Sachiko Matsubara (voice), Yoshihide Otomo (remix) 14. Koichi Makigami (voice), Jon Rose (violin), Yoshihide Otomo (turntables and remix) 15. Jon Rose (voice and organ), Yoshihide Otomo (turntables and remix), Kazuhisa Uchihashi (guitar) 16. Tokyo Nammy (voice), Jon Rose (violin and back vocals), Michihiro Satoh (tsugaru-shamisen), Kyoko Kuroda (piano and back vocals), Nelson Hiu (Asian flutes and back vocals), Masahiro Uemura (drums and back vocals), Yoshihide Otomo (guitar and back vocals), Sachiko Matsubara (back vocals) 17. Marie-Mart (voice), Jon Rose (violin and washing), Koichi Makigami (voice), Yoshihide Otomo (turntables and remix), Ryoji Hojito (Japanese hardcore salesman) 18. Mitsuru Nasuno (voice), Yoshihide Otomo (turntables), Jon Rose (violin on records) 19. Nelson Hiu (Asian flutes), Jon Rose (violin), Yoshihide Otomo (turntables and remix) 20. Jon Rose (violin), Yoshihide Otomo (turntables and remix), Zhan Chun Sheng (Er-hu Chinese violin), Hu Xin Hang (voice) 21. Michihiro Satoh (tsugaru-shamisen), Sachiko Matsubara (department store girl), Jon Rose (violin), Yoshihide Otomo (remix) 22. Jon Rose (violin), Yoshihide Otomo (turntables) 23. Mitsuru Nasuno, Yasuhiro Yoshigaki and Yoshihide Otomo (doom shop shingers), Pinako, Morika and Uchiyan (cult laughter), Shigenori Noda (manager) Tracks 2, 4, 8, 10, 12, 14, 21: Recorded by Takao Akimoto at GOK Sound in Tokyo, April 1994 Tracks 3, 6, 7, 9, 13, 19, 22: Recorded by Yasuo Fujimura and Yoshihide Otomo at Shinjuku Pit Inn in Tokyo, April 1994 Tracks 1, 10, 20: Recorded by Yoshihide Otomo and Jon Rose in Beijing, China, October 1994 Tracks 5, 11, 17: Recorded by Jon Rose in Australia, Winter 1994, with additional recordings by Yoshihide Otomo in Hokkaido, Japan, April 1994 Track 16: Recorded by Tsuguto Tsunoda at Minami Aoyama Mandala in Tokyo, April 1994 Track 15: Recorded by an unknown member of audience at Daikoku-za in Urakawa, Hokkaido, Japan, April 1994 Accessed 12.12.06 from http://www.japanimprov.com/ With John Rose 1995 Japan 51 Otomo Yoshihide 1959 2541 images/spacer.jpg Twins With Bob Ostertag. 1. Wacked/ Herb Robertson (parent) (3:58) 2. Exercises for Currency/ Yoshihide Otomo (twin) (6:51) 3. 3 Bear Rooms (Dust)/ Chris Cutler (parent) (4:42) 4. The Power of Success/ Bob Ostertag (twin) (5:44) 5. Fruits from Viet Nam/ Michiyo Yagi (parent) (3:55) 6. 4 Rooms of Hong Kong Stuntman/ Yoshihide Otomo (twin) (6:35) 7. YouÕre Going Nowhere/ Bob Ostertag (twin) (5:28) 8. Tabbing Will Get You There Faster/ Bob Ostertag (twin) (5:08) 9. Otok/ Yoshihide Otomo (twin) (6:23) Track 1 Herb Roberson: a Holton trumpet and Le Roy S. Green mouthpieces exclusively This trumpet solo was performed plunger muted. Recorded February 28, 1996 at the Corner Store Syndicate Studio, Brooklyn, New York Engineered by Jon Rosenberg Tracks 2, 6, 9 Yoshihide Otomo: sampler and hard-disk recorder Sampled guests: Sachiko Matsubara (voice-2; sampling materials-6), Yumiko Tanaka (shamisen and vocal-6), Shuichi Chino (piano-6) Recorded July 2-5, 1996 at Lost Space in Tokyo Recorded and mixed by Yoshihide Otomo Track 3 Chris Cutler: gongs, tubular bell, kit drums, Tibetan finger cymbals, clay drum, woodblock, tambourine and radio Composed by Chris Cutler Produced at Studio Midi-Pyrenees in Caudeval, France, 1996 Engineered by Bob Drake Tracks 4, 7, 8 Bob Ostertag: sampler Recorded June-July, 1996 in San Francisco Recorded and mixed by Bob Ostertag Track 5 Michiyo Yagi: 17-string and standard kotos Composed and arranged by Michiyo Yagi Recorded January 31, 1996 at Sound Pot in Tokyo Engineered by Masaki Sasaki Recording adviser: Akikazu Nakamura Bob Ostertag used an Ensoniq ASR-10 sampler, EmagicÕs Logic Audio and Deck II. Produced by Shigenori Noda Mastered July 14, 1996 at Infinite Audio in San Francisco Engineered by Bob Ostertag Cover concept: Bob Ostertag and Yoshihide Otomo Photography: Phyllis Christopher Design and artwork: wokshy-oishi *Notes of making ÒtwinsÓ Step 1: Ostertag, Otomo and Noda each choose a Òparent.Ó Step 2: Each ÒparentÓ makes a piece of their choosing. Step 3: Ostertag and Otomo each make a ÒtwinÓ using pieces of the Òparent.Ó *Twins! is also a variation of Yoshihide OtomoÕs Sampling Virus Project. Accessed 12.12.06 from http://www.japanimprov.com/ - 1996 Japan 51 Otomo Yoshihide 1959 2544 images/works/Yoshihide-2004-intonarumori.jpg Intonarumori Orchestra 1. Russolo Phone (8:21) Composed by Atsuhiro Ito Performed by Sachiko M, Otomo Yoshihide, Tetuzi Akiyama, Toshimaru Nakamura, Taku Sugimoto, and Atsuhiro Ito 2. Intonarumori (5:20) Composed and performed by Sachiko M 3. Future Circuit (7:38) Composed by Tetuzi Akiyama Performed by Sachiko M, Atsuhiro Ito, Tetuzi Akiyama, Otomo Yoshihide, Taku Sugimoto, and Toshimaru Nakamura 4. Disk (9:17) Composed by Toshimaru Nakamura Performed by Taku Sugimoto 5. Anode #4 (7:46) Composed by Otomo Yoshihide Performed by Otomo Yoshide, Toshimaru Nakamura, Tetuzi Akiyama, Atsuhiro Ito, Sachiko M, and Taku Sugimoto 6. All about Something 2 (14:07) Composed and conducted by Taku Sugimoto Performed by Otomo Yoshihide, Tetuzi Akiyama, and Toshimaru Nakamura Performed (on six replica Intonarumori) and recorded at Tama Art University Museum, Tokyo, February 24, 2002 Mastered by Toshimaru Nakamura Design by Megumi Furusawa Includes liner notes in Japanese and English (translated by Hiroko Tsuchida) Accessed 12.12.06 from http://www.japanimprov.com/ - 2004 Japan 152 James Tenney 1934 2910 images/spacer.jpg Love Me Do and Do You Want to Know a Secret. (Lennon/McCartney), arranged for piano 1992 Japan 51 Otomo Yoshihide 1959 3114 images/spacer.jpg Ground Zero August 31 *Otomo, Hideki Kato (bass), Yasuo Sano (drums), Makio Tada (drums), and Kyoko Kuroda (piano), with guest Koichi Makigami (vocal) at Aisling in Azabujuban, Tokyo 1991 February In addition to Otomo, Hideki Kato (bass) and Masahiro Uemura (drums) established as regular members February 18 *Otomo, Kato, and Uemura at Gospel in Senkawa, Tokyo April 6 *The Best of Indies concert in Hong Kong as Ground Zero, with Otomo and two local musicians, Eric Wong (bass) and Mayfair Z (drums) April 17 *Otomo, Kato, and Uemura at Gospel in Senkawa, Tokyo Very active on the Tokyo scene, with guest appearances by Eye Yamatsuka (vocal), Shuichi Chino (keyboards), Junji Hirose (sax), and Tony Buck (drums) May 27 *Otomo, Kato, and Uemura, with guests Chino, Hirose, and Michiaki Tanaka (percussion) at Shinjuku Pit Inn in Tokyo Jun 13 *At Buddy in Ekoda, Tokyo July 12 *At Buddy in Ekoda, Tokyo August 6 Recording for Fun House Inc., which was included in Nows the Time Workshop, Vol. 2, released in November of the same year August 15 *At Manda-la II in Kichijoji, Tokyo September 2 *Otomo, Kato, Uemura, with guests Yamatsuka (vocal), Chino, Hirose, Tanaka, Hideaki Sasaki (videos) at Shinjuku Pit Inn in Tokyo October 19 *At Chocolate City in Yoyogi, Tokyo November 1 *At Manda-la II in Kichijoji, Tokyo November 22 *Ground-O Orchestra at Shinjuku Pit Inn in Tokyo, with Otomo (guitar, turntable, conducting, arrangement), Makigami (vocal), Tenko (vocal), Kazuhiro Nomoto (saxes, horn arrangement), Hirose (sax), Sachi Hayasaka (sax), Masami Shinoda (saxes), Chino (keyboards), Kuroda (keyboards), Ryoji Hojito (piano), Natsuki Kido (guitar), Kato (bass), Uemura (drums), Buck (drums, sampler), and theater group Rinkogun (voices) 1992 January 18 *Otomo, Kato, and Uemura, with guests John Zorn (sax) and Mick Harris (vocal) at the Knitting Factory in New York February 27 *Otomo, Kato, and Uemura, with guests Yamatsuka (vocal) and Hojito (keyboards) at Penny Lane 24 in Sapporo Addition of Chino (keyboards), and Hirose (sax) as regular members February-May Recording of first album, GROUND-ZERO (God Mountain), which was released in February of the following year May 5 *Otomo, Kato, Uemura, Chino, and Hirose at Beam Hall in Shibuya, Tokyo May 10 *Ground Zero Orchestra at Beam Hall in Shibuya, Tokyo, with Otomo (conductor), group A: Naruyoshi Kikuchi (sax), Kido (guitar), Hojito (piano), Joji Sawada (bass), and Buck (drums); and group B: Kumiko Takara (marimba), Michael Sheridan (guitar), Hirose, Kato, and Uemura Kato moves to New York, is replaced by Kazuyoshi Kimoto (bass) August 1 *Otomo, Hirose, Hoppy Kamiyama (keyboards), Kimoto, Uemura, and Hedeaki Sasaki (videos) at Shinjuku Pit Inn Addition of Sasaki (videos) as a regular member December 7 *Otomo, Hirose, Chino, Kimoto, Uemura, and Sasaki at Kid-Airac Hall in Tokyo 1993 March 5 *Otomo, Hirose, Chino, Kimoto, Uemura, and Sasaki, with guest Seiichi Yamamoto (guitar) at Shibuya Quattro in Tokyo March 12 *Otomo, Hirose, Chino, Kimoto, Uemura, and Sasaki, with guest Yamamoto at Shinsaibashi Quattro in Osaka March 13 *Otomo, Hirose, Chino, Kimoto, Uemura, and Sasaki at Muse Hall in Kyoto March 14 *Otomo, Hirose, Chino, Kimoto, Uemura, and Sasaki at Nagoya Quattro May 21 *At Buddy in Ekoda, Tokyo May 27 *Otomo, Hirose, Chino, Kato, and Uemura at Das Festival in der Röhre in Germany May 30 *Otomo, Hirose, Chino, Kato, and Uemura at the Moers New Jazz Festival in Germany June 24 *Otomo, Hirose, Chino, Kimoto, Uemura, and Sasaki, with guest Samm Bennett (percussion) at Shinjuku Pit Inn in Tokyo Summer Recording of second album, Null and Void (Tzadik), which was released in 1995 August 29 *Otomo, Hirose, Chino, Kato, and Uemura at the International Now Music Festival Sapporo October 24 *Otomo, Kato, and Uemura at the STEIM Festival in Amsterdam December 9 *Otomo, Hirose, Chino, Kimoto, Uemura, and Sasaki at Shinjuku Pit Inn in Tokyo Temporary disbanding after the concert on December 9 1994 Membership change: Kazuhisa Uchihashi (guitar), Mitsuru Nasuno (bass), Masaki Shimizu (bass), Yasuhiro Yoshigaki (drums), Uemura (drums), in addition to Otomo August 11 *At Manda-la II in Kichijoji, Tokyo September 7 *At Arena Hall in Futagotamagawaen in Tokyo 1995 Shimizu replaced by Sachiko M (sampler) January 22 *At Shinjuku Pit Inn in Tokyo March 9 *At Manda-la II in Kichijoji, Tokyo March 11-16 Recording of third album, Revolutionary Pekinese Opera (Trigram), which was released the same year; and fourth album, Revolutionary Pekinese Opera Version 1.28 (ReR), which was released the following year April 2 *Otomo, Uchihashi, Nasuno, Uemura, Yoshigaki, and Sachiko M at TAKTLOS Festival in Switzerland April 6 *Otomo, Uchihashi, Nasuno, Uemura, Yoshigaki, and Sachiko M at the Knitting Factory in New York April 8 *Otomo, Uchihashi, Nasuno, Uemura, Yoshigaki, and Sachiko M at Lounge AX in Chicago April 19 *Otomo, Uchihashi, Nasuno, Uemura, Yoshigaki, and Sachiko M, with guest Heiner Goebbels (piano), at Shinjuku Pit Inn in Tokyo May 22 *Otomo, Uchihashi, Nasuno, Uemura, Yoshigaki, and Sachiko M at Festival International de Musique Actuelle de Victoriaville in Canada May 27 *Otomo, Uchihashi, Nasuno, Uemura, Yoshigaki, and Sachiko M at Musique Action in Nancy, France August 8 *Otomo, Uchihashi, Nasuno, Uemura, Yoshigaki, and Sachiko M at Shinsaibashi Quattro in Osaka August 9 *Otomo, Uchihashi, Nasuno, Uemura, Yoshigaki, and Sachiko M at Takutaku in Kyoto August 10 *Otomo, Uchihashi, Nasuno, Uemura, Yoshigaki, and Sachiko M in Okayama August 11 *Otomo, Uchihashi, Nasuno, Uemura, Yoshigaki, and Sachiko M at Bad Lands in Hiroshima August 17 *Otomo, Uchihashi, Nasuno, Uemura, Yoshigaki, and Sachiko M, with guests Naruyoshi Kikuchi (saxes) and Yumiko Tanaka (gidayu-shamisen) at La Mama in Shibuya, Tokyo August 20 *Otomo, Uchihashi, Nasuno, Yoshigaki, and Sachiko M, with guest Yumiko Tanaka, at International Now Music Festival Sapporo 1996 April 28 *At La Mama in Shibuya, Tokyo Addition of Kikuchi (saxes) and Tanaka (gidayu-shamisen) as regular members, to form an 8-piece unit April 30 *Otomo, Uchihashi, Nasuno, Uemura, Yoshigaki, Sachiko M, Kikuchi, and Tanaka at Shinjuku Pit Inn in Tokyo December 12 *Otomo, Uchihashi, Nasuno, Uemura, Yoshigaki, Sachiko M, Kikuchi, and Tanaka at 20000V in Koenji, Tokyo 1997 January 5-15 Recording of fifth and sixth albums, Consume Red (Ground Zero / Project: Consume, Vol. 1) (Sank-Ohso Discs) and Plays Standards (Nani Records), which were both released in April 1997 March 25 *Otomo, Uchihashi, Nasuno, Uemura, Yoshigaki, Sachiko M, Kikuchi, and Tanaka at Shinjuku Pit Inn in Tokyo April 14 *Otomo, Uchihashi, Nasuno, Uemura, Yoshigaki, Sachiko M, Kikuchi, and Tanaka at Shinjuku Pit Inn in Tokyo April 15 *Otomo, Uchihashi, Nasuno, Uemura, Yoshigaki, Sachiko M, Kikuchi, and Tanaka at Shinjuku Pit Inn in Tokyo Announcement of the disbanding of Ground Zero after the European tour in May May 6 and 11 *Otomo, Uchihashi, Nasuno, Uemura, Yoshigaki, Sachiko M, Kikuchi, Tanaka, and Yoshiaki Kondo (engineer) at the Angelica Festival in Bologna May15 *Otomo, Uchihashi, Nasuno, Uemura, Yoshigaki, Sachiko M, Kikuchi, Tanaka, and Kondo at the International New Music Festival Ring Ring in Belgrade May 20 *Otomo, Uchihashi, Nasuno, Uemura, Yoshigaki, Sachiko M, Kikuchi, Tanaka, and Kondo at FLEX in Vienna May 22 *Otomo, Uchihashi, Nasuno, Uemura, Yoshigaki, Sachiko M, Kikuchi, Tanaka, and Kondo at the Tolbooth Theatre in Stirling, Scotland May 24 *Otomo, Uchihashi, Nasuno, Uemura, Yoshigaki, Sachiko M, Kikuchi, Tanaka, and Kondo at the LMC Festival in London (BBC Radio Session) May 26 *Otomo, Uchihashi, Nasuno, Uemura, Yoshigaki, Sachiko M, Kikuchi, Tanaka, and Kondo at the LMC Festival in London July Release of Conflagration (Ground Zero / Project: Consume, Vol. 2) (Sank-Ohso Discs) Autumn Remixes of tunes from Cassibers live performance in Tokyo, 1992, under the name Ground Zero, which were included in the two-CD set Cassiber Live in Tokyo (off note) released in December of the same year 1998 March 8 *The final Ground Zero concert at On-Air West in Shibuya, Tokyo, with members Otomo, Hirose(sax), Kikuchi (sax), Masahiko Okura (sax), Chino (keyboards), Tatsuki Masuko (keyboards), Sachiko M (sampler), Kazunao Nagata (electronics), Tanaka (gitayu-shamisen), Nasuno (bass), Uemura (drums), Yoshigaki (drums) and Kondo (engineer) April Release of Consummation. (Ground Zero / Project: Consume, Vol. 3) (Sank-Ohso Discs) 1999 May Release of the final album, Last Concert (AMOEBiC), which was recorded live on March 8, 1998 . Accessed 20.11.2007 from http://www.japanimprov.com/yotomo/groundzero/history.html - 1990 Japan 51 Otomo Yoshihide 1959 3115 images/works/Yoshihide-1996-Rev_Pek_opera.jpg Revolutionary Pekinese Opera (ver 1.28) Revolutionary Pekinese Opera, Ver. 1.28 (ReR Megacorp, RéR GZ1) (UK) (CD) (Locus Solus, LSI 1007) (Japan) (CD) 1. Opening - Flying across the J.P.YEN (9:29) 2. Consume Mao (1:33) 3. Rush Capture of the Revolutionary Opera 1 (2:05) 4. Red Mao Book by Sony (4:23) 5. Crossing Frankfurt Four Times (2:02) 6. The Glory of Hong Kong - Kabukicho Conference (4:53) 7. Paraiso 1 (7:03) 8. Anouncing Good News from the West (0:40) 9. Revolutionary Enka 2001 (1:15) 10. Grand Pink Junktion Ballad (1:27) 11. Crossing Snow Mountains with Yamaha Bike (1:29) 12. Rush Capture of the Revolutionary Opera 2 (0:51) 13. Yellow Army, Beloved of the Various Nationalities (0:52) 14. Triumphant Junction (Grand Finale) (1:07) 15. International - Epilogue (2:49) 16. Paraiso 2 (5:36) All music by Otomo Yoshihide, the performers, and the sampled guests. Ground Zero Otomo Yoshihide: guitar, turntables Kazuhisa Uchihashi: guitar, effects Sachiko M: sampler, voice (10) Mitsuru Nasuno: bass Masahiro Uemura: drums, enka keyboard (9) Yasuhiro Yoshigaki: percussion, voice (10, 11) Guests: DJ-MAO: samples (1, 2, 10, 12, 13, 16) Kazuhiro Nomoto: bass clarinet (1) AYA: voice (4) Naruyoshi Kikuchi: tenor sax (9, 12-14) Mao Singers (13, 14): Sachiko M, haruna ito, Tsuguto Tsunoda, Masahiro Uemura, Yasuhiro Yoshigaki, Mitsuru Nasuno, Kazuhisa Uchihashi, and Otomo Yoshihide Sampled guests: Original Pekinese Opera groups Heiner Goebbels: piano, etc. Alfred 23 Harth: sax, etc. Jon Rose (2, 10): violin, etc. Norimizu Amaya: telephone samples (1) Osamu Hashimoto: voice (2) Steve Beresford: voice (2) Rudolf Ebner (10, 11): voice, etc. Compostela (3) Yumiko Tanaka (1, 13, 14): voice, shamisen Christian Marclay: record without cover (15, 16) Recorded and mixed in March 1995 by Yoshiaki Kondo at GOK Sound, Tokyo Mastered on April 4, 1995 by Allan Tucker at Foothill Digital in New York Re-mix and re-mastered in January 1996 by Otomo Yoshihide at Sank-ohso Studio and Kojima Recordings in Tokyo Photography and art direction: Hideaki Sasaki Artwork: Chikaco Oishi Produced by Otomo Yoshihide Post-produced by haruna ito (Locus Solus, LSI 1007) includes liner notes in Japanese by Otomo Yoshihide. Released 1996. Accessed 20.11.2007 from http://www.japanimprov.com/yotomo/groundzero/disco/pekinese128.html - 1996 Japan 173 Minoru Sato 1963 3305 images/spacer.jpg WrK WrK is a label, which is organized and managed by Minoru Sato ( m/s ) and Toshiya Tsunoda, in order to support specific art works by members who belong to this label. There is five artists as members: m/s, toshiya tsunoda, jio shimizu, hiroyuki iida, atsushi tominaga. WrK has attached importance to conceptual attitude that each member gives consideration to phenomena as shift/passage in time-space and to reception/perception of the phenomena. As a result, WrK activity is to organize and to distribute various style art works which become exhibition / live-installation / performance / multiple-work / study / paper and so on, to realize from this consideration. - 1994 Japan 173 Minoru Sato 1963 3306 images/works/Sato-2007-glass.jpg - 1. superposing five harmonic states 2. weaving seven resonances: with raw stereo material We have been performing music focusing on the materialistic nature (physical phenomena) of sounds by utilizing the reed organ and glass tubes. Our music is composed and constructed in such a way that however the phenomena we use reacts with the circumstances of the space - the situation of the site including the audience - our live performance involves and uses these conditions. Since this composition is a studio recording however, we decided to exclude acoustic spatial matters and the one-time-ness of live performances and instead composed the structure of resonances within certain divisions of time. This is similar to textiles - weaving resonances, rather than thread, in certain patterns. Superposing five harmonic states was developed by recording five harmonic states separately. Each of the harmonies was obtained by finding the characteristic sound effects made by the relationship of the chords of the organ and resonances of the glass tube. It was constructed by layering the recordings regularly in certain passages of time. The resonances of the organ and the tubes are left as they were originally recorded and the result is five separate recordings woven into a single piece. Weaving seven resonances: with raw stereo material was developed by recording a state where the resonances keep a subtle balance between the relationship of the organ and the glass tubes. From the originally recorded material we found seven characteristic frequencies and reconstructed them into a piece, by giving each individual volume a transition using optionally assigned periodic variations. Thus this composition, made of a single recording, is like a piece woven by one string. If our live performances were to be evaluated as music where we are presented with one-time incidents - i.e. reflecting the real time phenomena as now and there in the music - this CD could be evaluated as music to analyze the sound structure of these phenomena and to make those aspects audible. It is intended to create a narrative about the phenomena which resonate through constructed sounds. - 2007 Japan 173 Minoru Sato 1963 3307 images/works/Sato-2007-practice.JPG Practice for locality and non-locality derived from diffraction of lights - 2007 Japan 173 Minoru Sato 1963 3308 images/spacer.jpg circuit model of physical vibration for power source This is a circuit model of physical vibration for AC power by using several electromagnetic coils. The model presents the dynamic relation between the electromagnetic force by AC power and gravity. It presents variable shifts of physical vibration caused between the periodic pulling force by varied electromagnetic shifts and the gravity of solenoid coils. - 2002 Japan 173 Minoru Sato 1963 3310 images/works/Sato-2004-observation.jpg observation of thermal states through a stationary wave In this work, I deal with thermal states, their distribution and equivalence, through wave/vibration phenomena of the air. This work might be a model for how thermal exchange as an event creates a displacement in space-time. The motion of the compression wave that propagates in air follows the dynamics described by wave-equation formulas in physics. Basically, this dynamics requires several conditions, namely, a boundary condition of the observation space, the initial condition of the compression wave, and the propagation speed in the medium. In the case of air, the propagation speed is in proportion to the air temperature. As a result, when the space has certain boundaries, these conditions emphasize specific frequencies of air vibration. In terms of wave dynamics, this means that the resonance of the space is brought into relief by stationary waves. In this work, I create several observational spaces by arranging fixed measurments (caliber, length and thickness) of glass pipes that are treated differently according to thermal conditions. For each of the spaces it is possible to consider that the boundary conditions are the same, namely, glass pipe as the primary matter and the internal measurments. When the spaces are characterized by even thermal distribution and temperature, resonances appear at identical frequencies. In contrast, this work sets in motion varying thermal states to each observational space. By affecting the temperature of each space through a difference in lighting--either natural or artificial--the propagation speeds in the different spaces vary. And the emphasized frequencies also differ in proportion to the temperature. But let us also look at this from a different point of view, i.e. thermodynamics. The thermal agitation is a divergent phenomenon that reaches an equilibrium state of thermal distribution. In this sense, the spaces constantly exchange the thermal state amongst each other. The temperature which is generated by thermal agitation derives from molecular movements that are excited by light as electromagnetic waves. This is not an issue of motion dynamics in terms of individual molecular movement, but rather, an issue of statistical dynamics. Moreover, light equates with a kind of electromagnetic wave as a disposition of space-time itself which can propagate even through a vacuum. In a way, light is concerned with space-time itself which we generally regard as a criterion in distinguishing things. This view binds the vibration phenomena affected by thermodynamics to an issue of space-time. Thus the displacement of a stationary wave that we find through this work is a statistical result of phenomena which is generated by light as a disposition of space-time. I hope this work will function as an opportunity to imagine a state - 2004 Japan 173 Minoru Sato 1963 3312 images/works/Sato-1991-sound.jpg sound of electro-magnetic field by fluorescent lamps - 1991 Japan 173 Minoru Sato 1963 3313 images/works/Sato-1993-linear-manifold.gif linear manifold As a phenomenon exists by the phasing of fields, an incident appears with various of the cognition. This work presents a process in which a certain aspect is projected on a linear manifold, and a phenomenon which comes out from the process. The projection and the phenomenon are separately presented in two different spaces. The process in which the projection is reduced to the phenomenon and the phenomenon to projection is changing each time with various phases. It is our cognition that relates the separeted spaces and the changing processes. we meet an event which comes out from the relationships there. ( extract from SoundCulture Japan93 , translated by Ms.Toshie Kakinuma ) - 1993 Japan 173 Minoru Sato 1963 3314 images/works/Sato-1995-surface.jpg surface Apr. 1995, at street of AOYAMA in TokyoI installed this work in public space at several signs mounted on various trees along a particular street. This work consists of a small loudspeaker, a small dry battery and thin wires. I connected the wires to the sign board in order to make up electrical contact points. At these points, the unit catches various physical vibrations, from windows, traffic and other aspects of street events. The sound is generated by the electricity intermittently occuring at the contact points. - 1995 Japan 173 Minoru Sato 1963 3315 images/works/Sato-1995-PERTURB.gif emerge from the perturbation field In the following, I want to reflect on the perception of phenomena and the related cognition. Usually we see events as caused by a phenomenon and this phenomenon being formed by facts. But it is for certain that there exist various fields which create these facts. And it seems that the perturbation fields interact with all these fields. The fields which exist behind the phenomena are formed by even more microscopic and more differentiated fields. In a certain sense, a phenomenon is a warp resulting from a perturbation which comes from an interference of all these fields. I think, our cognition of the phenomena is inclined by a separating and unifying view of the complex interference of these fields. The meaning of phenomena is reached by deciding for uniqueness. By this, we will achieve only a limited perception from one point of view. This perspective, depending just on this one sided vision, will make the phenomena appear to be separate and unique. Thus our space is dominated by the cognitively perceived environment consisting of various separated phenomena. But we could imagine our conceptual view, the cognition of phenomena and the fields generating these phenomena to be different facts and we could also imagine that there are interfering facts which are supported by a different concept. We have to reconsider our points of view, so that we can connect both concepts. It requires an activity to perceive these fields which are hidden behind the phenomena. Finally the various separated cognitions will start to distribute more strongly according to the interferential concept which is accompanies the shifting of passages. It is important for us, to transfer our cognition from separativity to distributivity. I think, it will be possible for us to achieve this distributivity, if we are able to gain clear perturbations from the phenomena. In a way, the actual phenomena have purturbed our cognition continuously. - 1995 Japan 173 Minoru Sato 1963 3316 images/works/Sato-1996-circuitmodel.jpg circuit model of physical vibration for power source This is a circuit model of physical vibration for AC power by using several electromagnetic coils. The model presents the dynamic relation between the electromagnetic force by AC power and gravity. It presents variable shifts of physical vibration caused between the periodic pulling force by varied electromagnetic shifts and the gravity of solenoid coils. - 1996 Japan 173 Minoru Sato 1963 3317 images/works/Sato-1996-eigen.jpg eigen-state and the displacement Some of conditions as provided or given place are not only to specify the spherical co-ordinates but also to specify the function in place and an inherentlity of the state framing place that wed call the inherentlity of state to eigen-state. Both functionality and inherentlity have to be defined by action/process in time. Therefore place has to be normalized in time and space. In this sense, state is physical or technological or epistemological structure supposing the function and the spherical location in place. And then the inherentlity is meaning some restriction that becomes conditions to stand as this structure. Generally we have overlooked an aspect of this state differently from the shape and the function of place . The other hand the inherentlity which has become a system of understructure quite normalizes dispositions of the shape and the function as place . In a way some physical or technological or epistemological specific eigen-state has affected to place in order to maintain as place . An art work concerning the eigen-state of place will be to realize some displacements to other eigen-state within the range of possible variation that maintains the conditions of specific eigen-state as affecting place. And then the work will be to re-normalize by the displacements that affect to eigen-state. In this project, WrK activates some eigen-state at XEBEC hall and we would appear the disposition of place that is re-normalized by microscopic displacements. (general concept written by m/s) or the collective works of WrK 1996 Japan 173 Minoru Sato 1963 3318 images/works/Sato-1997-detecting.jpg Detecting space conditions from phase-contrast by using sine waves and a gate on various sounds Sound, from the point of physics, as a wave/vibration phenomenon, propagates in any space where medium (matter) exists. In the propagation process, for example, in a space with elements (such as; walls, a floor, a ceiling and so on), some reflection and diffraction of the sound will arise. These effects appear as a phase-contrast and are, of course, observable in the space. The phase-contrast is generated by 1) the difference in the distances between a direct course from the sound source and several courses via reflection and diffraction, 2) the phase change which depends on any fluctuation of boundary conditions of the elements when the reflection or diffraction arises. The contrast mostly appears as any fluctuation of amplitude (changes in the loudness of the sound). Even the loudness of a sine wave from an oscillator changes with any motion of the elements. For this reason, observing the phase-contrast at a fixed location becomes an index to dynamically measure the conditions of a space. In this work, the volumes of the sine waves (from the oscillators) are fixed and played in the performance space. At the same time, the sound waves in the space are recorded at a particular location in the space. Later on, the recorded sound is played back through a custom-made gate modulator. When the amplitude of the sound passes through a particular gate level, only parts of the recorded sound can pass through the gate. If we hypothesize that the elements have no movement, then the recorded sound becomes a fixed amplitude. If so, it is either possible or impossible for the sound to pass through as a whole. When the space condition changes (some movement of the elements, as well as, the movement of observers/audience), the change effects the phase-contrast. In a way, when the change is comparable to the motion of the sine wave from the oscillators, some fluctuation also affects the recorded sound. What we can find, in this way of detection of the condition of a space, is that it might make clearer, how we are concerned with a space and its components (elements, such as walls, etc), each as a function and an activity of the conditions of a space. Finally, in the result, we can hear the whole activity of a given space. (text by m/s) - 1996 Japan 173 Minoru Sato 1963 3319 images/works/Sato-1997-numerical.gif numerical wave observation - 1997 Japan 173 Minoru Sato 1963 3320 images/works/Sato-1999-SolarCellCamera.jpg solar cell camera - 1999 Japan 173 Minoru Sato 1963 3321 images/works/Sato-2000-finding.jpg finding of a state of light: distribution of luminous intensity and its fluctuation Light is a fascinating phenomenon, but understanding its essence is extraordinarily difficult. Unlike wave/vibration phenomena propagated through material media, as an inherency of space-time itself light has the disposition of electromagnetic wave which can propagate even through a vacuum [*1] and at the same time has the disposition of photon particles which can hold localizable energy and momentum. The complementarity of lights dual disposition as wave and particle has made it a research topic of continued interest and thinking about the essence of light gives rise to a wide manifold concept. Light is also one of the most familiar of physical phenomena. By illuminating the spaces we inhabit, light is an indispensable element in the structure of cognitive perception known as vision whereby we are able to distinguish objects. In this work I have dealt with this familiar light that gives rise to such conceptual manifoldness in relation to the place on which it illuminates. Lighting as a function to illuminate spaces is a kind of apparatus built into a place in order either to light up the entire place uniformly or to highlight one characteristic part. I regard the apparatus as a kind of under-structure which forms a property of the place. In other words this property which is some state of physical, epistemological, organizational under-structure must continue to operate in the place where is defined as a closed finite range in space-time, in order for the place to maintain its integrity[*2]. Lighting as a such an apparatus primarily provides information useful for the visual perception of space. And when we consider the functions attributed to that place, our own activities as we enter into it are greatly involved in this illuminated space. Moreover, even the lighting that appears to illuminate the space uniformly, if seen as a space-time phenomenon can also be recognized as a fluctuating light source turning on and off in 50 cycles per second or more. Normally, however, we are not aware of these cycles. It is for this reason that I believe that focusing on the luminous fluctuations and distribution of the light source is an extremely useful way of understanding place and its property. In this project I have been able to find several characteristic distributions of light as regards a property of the place at ICC. In finding of a state of light: distribution of luminous intensity and its fluctuation I have treated those states in term of the movement of objects. The phenomena that will be visible/audible here are one in which light propagating as an inherency of space-time goes through an energy exchange using the contact potential difference occurring between the two distinct materials within a solar cell to be translated into the dynamic movement of speakers cone paper. Thus the distribution of light and its fluctuations found as proper to a specific place are rendered perceivable as the movement of an object without the addition of any energy from the outside. Through this movement made perceivable I attempt to reflect once again on the relationship between the state of light that we experience on a daily basis and the places that the light illuminates. And in the process, I hope to imagine the emergence of a world distributed by the manifold concept of light . *1- There is a tendency to conflate the material wave/vibration phenomena as sound with the electromagnetic wave phenomenon as light , but the two are fundamentally different. The only characteristic they have in common is the periodicity of movement found in the partial differential form of the wave-equation formula. *2- On Place see my Place: concerning its concept and measurement Site of Sound: of Architecture and the Ear. Brandon LaBelle and Steve Roden eds. Errant Bodies Press, SMART ART PRESS. - 2000 Japan 173 Minoru Sato 1963 3324 images/works/Sato-2002-circuit.jpg circuit model of physical vibration for power source This is a circuit model of physical vibration for AC power by using several electromagnetic coils. The model presents the dynamic relation between the electromagnetic force by AC power and gravity. It presents variable shifts of physical vibration caused between the periodic pulling force by varied electromagnetic shifts and the gravity of solenoid coils. - 2002 Japan 170 Akio Suzuki 1941 3326 images/spacer.jpg Self Discovery Exercise Throwing pieces of junk from a bucket down the stairs. - 1963 Japan 170 Akio Suzuki 1941 3327 images/works/Suzuki-1988-Space.jpg Hinatabokko no kukan (Space in the Sun) This space consists of two huge parallel walls, in between which the artist can sit all day and purify his hearing by listening to the reflected sounds of nature. This space leads the artist to discover a new method of listening. Suzuki himself comments, Sound, which had been conceptually imprisoned in various spaces, is freed to circle the world. - 1988 Japan 169 Atau Tanaka 1964 3375 images/spacer.jpg Prométhée Numérique - 2002 Japan 169 Atau Tanaka 1964 3376 images/spacer.jpg mp3q - 2000 Japan 169 Atau Tanaka 1964 3378 images/spacer.jpg Biosensors - 1990 Japan 169 Atau Tanaka 1964 3379 images/spacer.jpg SensorBand a trio of musicians using interactive technology. Gestural interfaces - ultrasound, infrared, and bioelectric sensors - become musical instruments. The group, Edwin van der Heide, Zbigniew Karkowski, Atau Tanaka, each soloists on their instruments for over six years, formed Sensorband to create a performance ensemble. Edwin plays the MIDIconductor, machines worn on his hands that send and receive ultrasound signals, measuring the hands rotational positions of and relative distance. Zbigniew activates his instrument by the movement of his arms in the space around him. This cuts through invisible infrared beams mounted on a scaffolding structure. Atau plays the BioMuse, a system that tracks neural signals (EMG), translating electrical signals from the body into digital data. Together, Sensorband creates a live group dynamic, bringing a visceral physical element to interactive technologies. Sensorbands projects center around the theme of physicality and human control/discontrol in relation with technology. Accessed 25.04.2008 from http://www.sensorband.com/root.html - 1993 Japan 171 Yasunao Tone 1935 3383 images/spacer.jpg One Man Show by a Composer - 1962 Japan 171 Yasunao Tone 1935 3385 images/spacer.jpg Hi-Red Center a happening group - 1963 Japan 171 Yasunao Tone 1935 3386 images/spacer.jpg Sweet Sixteen - 1963 Japan 171 Yasunao Tone 1935 3387 images/spacer.jpg Biogode Process Music Festival - 1966 Japan 171 Yasunao Tone 1935 3388 images/spacer.jpg Theater Piece for Computer - 1966 Japan 171 Yasunao Tone 1935 3389 images/spacer.jpg Intermedia Festival - 1969 Japan 172 Miki Yui 1971 3405 images/works/Yui-2001-wanderland.jpg wanderland stepping into dark space. sense of time and space disappears in anechoic darkness. the silence resounds inside me. in a vague darkness, appears slowly, barely but certainly the acoustic space in various patterns. parallel to the thin sound of sine waves, small lights start to breathe, giving dim light in the space. the density of the space slowly changes along with the movement of the sounds. As each life in nature has its own time in the whole cycle, the each sounds in the installation play loopwith its own metronome. Sounds appear and disappear, merge with each other, their movement creating texture to play a song which is never the same. The composition is programmed on MAX/MSP to play 6-8 different samples generated by many layers of random controlled metronomes. The time structure in the composition becomes not linar but to constantly changing texture. The movement of sounds on 6 speakers are programmed based after a chaos theory. Sounds are played on a very quiet volume, giving space for the person to sink into listening. wanderland is like a multi -layerd acoustic map of memories. To make the true experience of the anechoic space, the installation is made for one person in the space. The composition becomes a complete piece of music in each persons experience. This shares the idea of small sounds - acoustic perception in space, Using the unique character of the anechoic space, It approaches the listening space from opposite direction. from inside to outside then outside to inside. Accessed 24.04.2008 from http://www.mikiyui.com/wanderland/wanderland.html MAX/ MSP programming Yunchul Kim, Miki Yui _6 speakers _ computer _ MAX/MSP _audio interface _ MIDI interface _ LCD light 2001 Japan 188 Rolf Julius 1939 3415 images/spacer.jpg NOISELESS Collaboration with Akio Suzuki. As suggested by its title, the main theme of this exhibition will be minimal sound and silence. In order to create an appropriately refined atmosphere, the exhibition will be held exclusively in the evening for the first time in the history of the museum. We hope you will join us in enjoying Suzuki + Julius’s noiseless sound installations in the spring evening, with the cherry blossoms along the Lake Biwa Canal in the background. Accessed 26.02.2008 from http://www.momak.go.jp/English/exhibitionArchive/2007/353.html - 2007 Japan 170 Akio Suzuki 1941 3717 images/works/Suzuki-1995-MakeUp.jpg Make Up 1995 Japan 228 Paul DeMarinis 1954 3848 images/spacer.jpg Alien Voices Visitors enter two antique wood and glass telephone booths engage in conversation, hearing the melody of their voices translated into music or changed into whispers, robotic monotones or alien melodies. 1988 Japan 30 Carsten Nicolai 1965 4261 images/works/Nicolai-2001-empty_garden.jpg empty garden empty garden is a sound piece that tries to connect two spatially separated locations. the urban space becomes the actual place of action. at the point of departure (museum) the visitor is invited to enter a nearby garden. on his walk he carries small loudspeakers on his shoulders which allow him to listen to a musical composition and to perceive everyday noise. high-frequency sound on the soundtrack alerts the visitor's attention to perceive background noise that is ordinarily blanked out or filtered. this mixture of the components alerts the viewer's perception to situations that surround him, ranging from the architectural spaces within the museum through the busy streets of tokyo leading him into the emptiness and intimacy of an unplanted garden. Accessed 12.06.2009 from http://www.carstennicolai.de/?c=worksandw=empty_garden portable cd player, shoulder speakers, soundtrack 2001 Japan 114 Merzbow 1956 4438 images/spacer.jpg Collection Era Vol. 1 1. "Electric Environment" - 24:00 2. "Untitled Material Action" - 23:57 3. "Telecom Manipulation" - 18:18 1981 Japan 114 Merzbow 1956 4439 images/spacer.jpg Remblandt Assemblage Side A: # Title Length 1. "Remblandt Assemblage" 9:44 2. "Voice Of Switters" 2:09 3. "Theme Of Dadaist" 9:39 4. "Hans Arp" 1:47 Side B: # Title Length 1. "Tape Dada" 5:52 2. "Music Concert" 2:34 3. "Prepared Guitar Solo 1" 17:32 4. "Prepared Guitar Solo 2" 3:59 1980 Japan 114 Merzbow 1956 4441 images/spacer.jpg Lowest Music and Arts founded in 1979 in order to trade cassette tapes with other underground artists 1979 Japan 114 Merzbow 1956 4442 images/spacer.jpg ZSF Produkt 1984 Japan 114 Merzbow 1956 4443 images/spacer.jpg Mechanization Takes Command 1984 Japan 114 Merzbow 1956 4445 images/spacer.jpg Noisembryo which was a Merzbow album sealed in a car released in a limited edition of one copy. The disc was sealed in the CD player of a BMW sedan which was rewired to play the cd whenever the car was started. 1994 Japan 114 Merzbow 1956 4447 images/works/Merbow-2005-CrueltyFreeLife.jpg Cruelty Free Life 2005 Japan )